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You’ve Come a Long Way Baby!
HireHeels Celebrates International Women’s Day

Posted on March 8th, 2009 in Sista Christian Louboutin by sistachristianlouboutin

Today is International Women’s Day and what better way to celebrate than by giving a higher than 5-inch hireheels kick-up to the lady who inspired us to create this out-of-the-shoebox blog in the first place (see Hillary Clinton’s OpEd below).

We salute you Madam Sec. — for all that you have done and all that you will do— to further women’s issues here at home and across the globe. You have pragmatically, systematically and diplomatically taken the world by storm in the last 6 weeks without fanfare or pomp. your star shines without elaborate Hollywood-stye staging, styrofoam columns or pricey kobe beef dinners…

Your poise and grace under pressure astonishes and inspires us to be better people ourselves.


Secretary of state Hillary Clinton op-ed celebrating international women’s day March 8, 2009
Saturday, 07 March 2009 19:14 By The Independent Reporter:

sistachristian_byline

On a trip to China eleven years ago, I met with women activists who told me about their efforts to advance conditions for women in their country. They offered a vivid portrait of the challenges women faced: employment discrimination, inadequate health care, domestic violence, antiquated laws that hindered women’s progress.

I met some of those women again a few weeks ago, during my first trip to Asia as Secretary of State. This time, I heard about the progress that has been made in the past decade. But even with some important steps forward, these Chinese women left no doubt that obstacles and inequities still remain, much as they do in many parts of the world.

I’ve heard stories like theirs on every continent, as women seek opportunities to participate fully in the political, economic and cultural lives of their countries. And on March 8, as we celebrate International Women’s Day, we have a chance to take stock of both the progress we’ve made and the challenges that remain—and to think about the vital role that women must play in helping to solve the complex global challenges of the 21st century.

Today, more women are leading governments, businesses, and non-governmental organizations than in previous generations. But that good news has a flip side. Women still comprise the majority of the world’s poor, unfed and unschooled. They are still subjected to rape as a tactic of war and exploited by traffickers globally in a billion dollar criminal business.

Honor killings, maiming, female genital mutilation, and other violent and degrading practices that target women are still tolerated in too many places today. Just a few months ago, a young girl in Afghanistan was on her way to school when a group of men threw acid in her face, permanently damaging her eyes, because they objected to her seeking an education. Their attempt to terrorize the girl and her family failed. She said, “My parents told me to keep coming to school even if I am killed.”

That young girl’s courage and resolve should serve as an inspiration to all of us—women and men—to continue to work as hard as we can to ensure that girls and women are accorded the rights and opportunities they deserve.

Global problems are too big and too complex to be solved without the full participation of women. Strengthening women’s rights is not only a continuing moral obligation—it is also a necessity as we face a global economic crisis, the spread of terrorism and nuclear weapons, regional conflicts that threaten families and communities, and climate change and the dangers it presents to the world’s health and security.

These challenges demand everything we’ve got. We will not solve them through half measures. And yet too often, on these issues and many more, half the world is left behind.

Especially in the midst of this financial crisis, we must remember what a growing body of research tells us: Supporting women is a high-yield investment, resulting in stronger economies, more vibrant civil societies, healthier communities, and greater peace and stability. And investing in women is a way to support future generations; women spend much more of their incomes on food, medicine and schooling for children.

Even in developed nations, the full economic power of women is far from being realized. Women in many countries continue to earn much less than men for doing the same jobs—a gap that President Obama took a step toward closing in the United States this year, when he signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which strengthens women’s ability to challenge unequal pay.

Women need to be given the chance to work for fair wages, access credit and launch businesses. They deserve equity in the political sphere, with equal access at the voting booth and the freedom to petition their government and run for office. They have a right to health care for themselves and their families, and a right to send their children to school—their sons and their daughters. And they have a vital role to play in establishing peace and stability worldwide. In regions torn apart by war, it is often the women who find a way to reach across differences and discover common ground.

As I travel around the world in my new role, I will keep in mind the women I’ve already met on every continent—women who have struggled against extraordinary odds to change laws so they can own property, have rights in marriage, go to school, support their families—even serve as peacekeepers.

And I will be a vocal advocate—working with my counterparts in other nations, as well as non-governmental organizations, businesses and individuals—to keep pressing forward on these issues, so that the world will move closer to finally realizing the full promise of women and girls.

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HireHeels Celebrates International Women’s Day'

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HireHeels Celebrates International Women’s Day'.


  1. on March 8th, 2009 at 2:13 pm

    excellent post sista – i like the “higher than 5-inch hireheels kick-up” part … now that was pretty good. i think the STORY OF THE little GIRL that HAD ACID TOSSED IN HER Eyes was touching, inspirational & horrible…ALL IN ONE.

  2. Cindy said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 5:03 pm

    thank you for posting this.
    we had a wonderful local women’s day celebration yesterday…marching, singing and proclaiming.
    Today america is ‘springing forward” the clock..Wish they would spring forward mentally and culturally, too…like say, 50 yrs, at least!
    But, patriarchy is a jealous, lazy slob, and is not about to surrender the remote control.

  3. foxyladi14 said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 6:08 pm

    beautiful,it brought tears to my eyes.
    we should be so much farther along by now.in our journey towards equality.sad indeed.
    this past year has been a real setback for us.
    but never give up the fight ladies.we will prevail..

  4. patm said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 7:03 pm

    A well written post. Thank you. Also, ladies, take a minute and listen to this 12 year old girl sing. I think her voice is “from God”.
    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1626759/faryl_smith_britains_got_talent_amazing_12_yr_old_singer/

  5. hireheels said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 7:12 pm

    Good for you Cindy – for participating in celebrating int’l women’s day!! Indeed patriarchy ain’t givin’ up without a fight – so we’ll keep on keepin’ on !!!

    we celebrate all of u uber fab hireheelers ;-)

  6. princess wears prada said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 7:13 pm

    The world is indeed a better place for women with Hillary at the helm…Here are Hillary’s “spoken” words, today, on Int’l Women’s Day:

    On the occasion of International Women’s Day 2009, I am proud to honor women around the world who are blazing trails and surmounting obstacles in pursuit of equality and opportunity. Although you may not know their names or recognize their faces, these women advocates are hard at work in every country and on every continent, seeking to fulfill their right to participate fully in the political, economic and cultural lives of their societies. Often working against great odds and at great personal sacrifice, they are a key to global progress in this new century and deserve our admiration and support.

    Put simply, we have much less hope of addressing the complex challenges we face in this new century without the full participation of women. Whether the economic crisis, the spread of terrorism, regional conflicts that threaten families and communities, and climate change and the dangers it presents to the world’s health and security, we will not solve these challenges through half measures. Yet too often, on these issues and many more, half the world is left behind.

      This is not simply a matter of emotion or altruism. A growing body of research tells us that supporting women is a high-yield investment, resulting in stronger economies, more vibrant civil societies, healthier communities, and greater peace and stability. But even so, no nation in the world has yet achieved full equality for women.

    Women still comprise the majority of the world’s poor, unfed, and unschooled. Hundreds of thousands of women die in childbirth every year. They are subjected to rape as a tactic of war and exploited by traffickers globally in a billion dollar criminal business. Laws are still on the books denying women the right to own property, access credit, or make their own choices within their marriage. And honor killings, maiming, female genital mutilation, and other violent and degrading practices that target women are tolerated in too many places today.

    Like all people, women deserve to live free from violence and fear. To create peaceful, thriving communities, women must be equal partners. That means making key resources available to women as well as men, including the chance to work for fair wages and have access to credit; to vote, petition their governments and run for office; to know they can get healthcare when they need it, including family planning; and to send their children to school—their sons and their daughters.

    Women also have a crucial role to play in establishing peace worldwide. In regions torn apart by war, it is often the women who find ways to reach across differences and discover common ground as mothers, caretakers, and grassroots advocates. One need only look to Northern Ireland, Rwanda, the Balkans, and parts of Central America to see the impact of women working in their communities to bridge divides in areas of sectarian conflict.

    This week, as we celebrate the accomplishments and the untapped potential of women around the world, we must remind ourselves that ensuring the rights of women and girls is not only a matter of justice. It is a matter of enhancing global peace, progress, and prosperity for generations to come.

    When women are afforded their basic rights, they flourish. And so do their children, families, communities, and nations.

  7. Back Bay Style said,

    on March 8th, 2009 at 8:13 pm

    hooray for Hillary! Without women, I believe there will be no peace. So many women are so far from flourishing. I am thrilled Hillary’s true worth is so valued and praised by the rest of the world, sadly, not so much here at home.


  8. on March 8th, 2009 at 8:52 pm

    best wishes to all of the vital women (and men) who have made our little shoe box so special in the past year!! and bbs, I think sec clinton will get her just due over time. she will quietly make things happen…


  9. on March 8th, 2009 at 9:02 pm

    sis iv been saying the same thing & still am . give it 4 more years . im sure berry will crash & burn by that time. just in time for hillary 2 come & save the day

  10. Flowerchild2 said,

    on March 9th, 2009 at 8:41 am

    http://womencount.org/its_our_time

    If you did not receive this message from HillaryClinton.com’s online community, please review the information and sign the petition for:

    “WomenCount is calling for the creation of a Presidential Commission on Women in the first 100 days of Barack Obama’s presidency.”

    Let’s inspire the President, shall we?

  11. Cindy said,

    on March 9th, 2009 at 9:22 am

    If i may, I’d like to share an email I just received from my cousin in Switzerland….She met her Swiss husband while both were in Peace Corps in South America in the 1970′s. She has lived in Switz. for 30 yrs and raised a family there. Like most women, she’s very hardworking! here’s her e-mail:

    ” There were lots and lots of demos yesterday, but I had to work. Tomorrow on March 10th I am taking part in a “Equal pay for equal work” action. We will be talking to people on the street and handing out red shopping bags. Women in Switzerland earn on the average 19% less than men. This means that women would have to work 49 days longer than men to earn the same amount of money, ie. January 1st to March 10th is 49 work days. There will be action groups all over the country tomorrow. ”

    thanks for sharing cindy!!


  12. on March 9th, 2009 at 10:26 am

    hmmm hireheels.com in now on twitter … looks like ill have to check that out

  13. Back Bay Style said,

    on March 9th, 2009 at 5:59 pm

    Hi Sista and Boogie, I certainly think Hillary is doing and will do a phenomenal job. My gripe is just with the unceasing small minded media jabs at her. But then, she would probably be the first to say ignore them.

    Jabs?!? No kidding… Just see our post on “HRC Charms Russies Galore…” And You’re right. Madam Sec. would graciously say ignore them and focus on the bigger picture…

  14. kavala007 said,

    on March 9th, 2009 at 7:24 pm

    HireHeels and the State Department website keep me sane.
    I love the writing here and I go to the State Department website to read the Secretary of States comings and goings and to read DipNotes.
    thanks for stopping by k-007! visit our closet often!!


  15. on March 9th, 2009 at 7:24 pm

    i think hillary is more than capable of throwing some pretty good Jabs back at them…..

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